Monday, 15 December 2008

A Flock of Pelicans

A recent find is the Pelican Project at Things Magazine. It is an attempt to photograph all of the old Pelican (Penguin's non-fiction arm from the 1930s to the 1980s) covers: a very worthwhile exercise, as some of them are brilliant bits of design work. Here are just a few to give you a taste...

1958:


1961 (a cover by Larry Carter):


1962:


1964 (cover by Barry Trengove):


1966:


1970:


1971:


1972 (and the second cover is by our old friend Ralph Steadman):



1973:


1974 (cover by Clive Limpkin):


1975 (cover by Michael Morris):


1977:


In other news, A Journey Round My Skull has tracked down a copy of the Lynd Ward-illustrated Beowulf (for only $6!) which I discussed here. Go over there and be impressed.



Finally, I must wonder aloud if the people who Googled their way here looking for "erotic wet cement stories", "pubic stock photos" or the deeply mysterious "nifty loincloth story boy" found what they were looking for.

5 comments:

Ian Brian Shimkoviak said...

the status seekers is just great. Love those CBS eyes...

JRSM said...

I was dead certain it was a Romek Marber cover at first, and even said so before (luckily before hitting PUBLISH) checking and finding otherwise. A perfect bit of relatively simple, effective illustration.

Rex Parker said...

"Anarchism" and "Human Identity" are amazing. I'm going to have to come to this site after every trip to Barnes & Noble, where, as my wife can tell you, all I do is complain about how ugly books are.

Thanks for the link to "Pop Sensation,"

RP

JRSM said...

My pleasure, Rex: I've been reduced to helpless tears of laughter by your blog while at work on several occasions.

Steerforth said...

I've just looked at the website. I particularly liked the 'Recorded Jazz - a Critical Guide' by Brian Rust.

Those Pelican covers had far more wit than anything around today. I blame the grey people (not the extra-terrestrials who do horrible things to your genitals) who have changed the culture of publishing from an art into a science.