Friday, 19 July 2013

Tutis has a Challenger

In these sad days when Tutis no longer seems to be producing new, demented editions of the classics, I have found the days long and grey and empty. But now I have discovered the output of Emereo Publishing, and I am like a man reborn.

Marvel at the unexpected introduction of Vikings into the French Revolution...


Enjoy the weird obsession with fungus and flies, no matter the topic of the book...







..though, oddly, not on the cover of a book actually about fungus...



Get off the beaten track with these unexpected interpretations of travel literature...








..or unorthodox approaches to history...

 
..biography...

Nice bum, General



Unfortunately, his family all had trouble reading the book, what with their flippers

..theology...

Perverts

...the wonders of science...




..sociology...

It's more exciting than you'd expect

..cookery...

Sift the flour, baking powder and sugar into a bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg with the milk. Pour this into the flour mixture and whisk until combined, then add the vanilla seeds and whisk again. Gradually pour in the browned butter and whisk well, then fire into the fucking Sun.

..the budgerigars of Russian literature...


..or sport--there's something for everyone.




16 comments:

Snail said...

I see that they are (ostensibly) an Australian firm, so that might explain the pale-yellow robin and the yellow rosella. Oh, who am I kidding? There's no logic.

the bog logger said...

This was absolute gold. Fungus! Fungus everywhere!

amateur idler said...

Oh my gosh. Tell me this isn't real. These are a joke, right? Someone made these as a joke, right?

Tororo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tororo said...

Where are these marvelous books in Emereo Publishing's catalogue, I marvel? Was public interest in them so high that the print-on-demand printing machines went red-hot and exploded?

JRSM said...

Yes, their own catalogue just lists various dubious IT books. But I'm pleased to learn they're Australian--finally, a source of national pride!

Drew said...

Brilliant. Love the cooking/sun aside.

Karl said...

Ew... Man, these are downright disturbing; looking at them is like having a conversation with a schizophrenic who's off his medication.

JRSM said...

Possibly the side-effects are those of squirrel scurvy?

Thank you, Drew.

Brian Busby said...

A challenger, indeed... or is it the heir? Either way, I suggest that up-and-comer Zhingoora Books may prove to be a contender. Their covers tend to be safe - clip art fairies used in fairy tales, flags on books about countries - but every once and awhile they get crazy. Just take a peak at their edition of The Finest Story on the World.

If alternate histories are your thing, I present George Washington on his way to fight the British in 1837 Canada.

i'll leave off by noting that unlike Tutis and Emereo, Zhingoora provide their designer's name,,, or might it be that he is Zhingoora Books?

JRSM said...

So a human being was involved somewhere in the "design" of these books. Intriguing. I can't believe they used that font for the text of the books... My eyes, they bleed!

Miche Doherty said...

A nice bit of serendipity among the extraordinary randomness: the book on fungus doesn't have fungus on its cover, but it does have a portrait of Molière, the author of Tartuffe. Which is French for truffle.

JRSM said...

See, now I'm starting to think some thought might have gone into these, which is worrying...

John Self said...

And also: did Heath Robinson really write a book about fungus cultivation??

JRSM said...

You should see the device he invented to pick them.

Shinwell Johnson said...

This is the nittiest of picking, but that should be "W. (William) Heath Robinson," not "W. Heath (William Heath) Robinson." I think most of us can figure out for ourselves that "Heath" is short for "Heath."

(Though not quite the same thing, this reminds me of a list I once saw, of pseudonyms used by science fiction writers. According to it, "C.J. Cherryh" was a pseudonym for Caroline J. Cherryh.)